Subscribe for FREE with:

Source: Treyger's office

Source: Treyger’s office

The following is a press release from the offices of Councilman Mark Treyger:

Council Member Mark Treyger was joined on Saturday morning by hundreds of Gravesend residents and FDNY members to co-name the corner of West 11th Street and Highlawn Avenue “Firefighter William ‘Billy’ Tropea Way” in honor of the longtime firefighter and 9/11 hero who passed away in 2010 from cancer contracted in the aftermath of the terror attack.

Billy was born on July 14, 1956 and was raised in Gravesend, attending P.S. 215, David A. Boody Intermediate School, John Dewey High School and Brooklyn College. He began his career as a New York City firefighter in 1987 and was honored to give back to his community in this capacity. He served the city for over 22 years at Engine 245, Ladder 161 and Battalion 43 in Coney Island as a firefighter and aide to the Battalion Chief. In addition to being a firefighter, Billy was remembered as an accomplished pianist, competitive athlete, handyman, gardener and dedicated family man, especially to his children, Samantha and Billy.

At Saturday’s ceremony, Billy’s family and friends shared stories highlighting some of the many ways he helped others, including complete strangers, without ever seeking the spotlight. The ceremony featured the FDNY color guard and FDNY Emerald Society Pipes & Drums and was attended by hundreds of Billy’s friends and neighbors and dozens of his former FDNY colleagues. Following remarks from Billy’s wife Janet, friends Chris Bruno, Robert Glynn and Lt. Michael Duran, George Frenzel of the local block association, Council Member Treyger, Senator Marty Golden and Borough President Eric Adams, the family unveiled the new sign at W. 11th Street and Highlawn Avenue designating the block “Firefighter William ‘Billy’ Tropea Way.”

“I am proud to help ensure that Billy Tropea’s life and legacy will be honored for generations to come by dedicating this street in his memory. By all accounts, Billy was a remarkable person who was committed to helping others however possible, whether as a member of the FDNY or simply as a great neighbor. It was incredibly touching to hear his family and friends share their memories and stories of Billy at Saturday’s ceremony. It was also great to see so many of Billy’s friends and nearly the entire block take the time to remember this great individual,” said Council Member Treyger.

“Co-naming W. 11th Street at Highlawn Avenue in my husband’s name was a true honor. He was a man who led his live helping others in any way he possibly could. My family, including our daughter Samantha, son-in-law Joe, grandson Joseph and son Billy are extremely proud, grateful and blessed to have had Billy in our lives. Whenever someone drives or walks past this sign, please remember to show an act of kindness that day, as Billy did every day of his life,” said Janet Tropea.

Council Member Treyger also extended his thanks to the Tropea family, the FDNY and everyone who played a role in making this co-naming happen, including West 11th Street Block Association President George Frenzel, Council Member David Greenfield and Assembly Member Bill Colton.

Golden (l) and Kemmerer (r)

Golden (l) and Kemmerer (r)

Republican State Senator Marty Golden is facing a Democratic challenge on ballots this November, this time from Bay Ridge’s James Kemmerer.

The 12-year incumbent pol, who lost most of Bay Ridge but comfortably won the district as a whole with a 16-point margin, will debate his opponent tonight at the Bay Ridge Community Council’s “Great Debate.”

Kemmerer confirmed his candidacy to Bensonhurst Bean in May, backed by the Bay Ridge Democrats, a progressive Democratic club. He’s a small business owner who has lived in Bay Ridge for about a decade. So far, his campaign has depicted Golden as a target of the Moreland anti-corruption commission in the pocket of developers and big business. Kemmerer is running as the good government candidate, and is pushing public financing of elections.

It’s the first debate between the two. When challenged in 2012 by Andrew Gounardes, the debate turned feisty; with a lot of the same people backing Kemmerer, there’s a good shot tonight’s debate will be similarly informative and exciting.

The event takes place at Holy Angels Catholic Academy, 337 74th Street, at 7:30pm.

Correction (1:59pm): The original version of this article erroneously stated that James Kemmerer has “lived in this website for about a decade.” That was a mistake. James Kemmerer does not, and likely has never, lived in a website – this one, or any other. He lives in Bay Ridge. He previously lived in Pennsylvania, which is certainly less interesting than living in a website, but definitely more factual and infinitely more possible.

John Cosentino and his mother. (Source: Anthony Cosentino via Brooklyn Eagle)

John Cosentino and his mother. (Source: Anthony Cosentino via Brooklyn Eagle)

A Bensonhurst couple is fighting to save the last-resort home of their severely autistic son, who lives in one of the state’s few remaining housing facilities for the developmentally disabled that is now slated for closure.

Anthony and Mary Ann Cosentino are pleading with the state to reverse a plan that would shutter the Brooklyn Development Center in East New York, which has been their son’s home for the last 35 years.

Home Reporter reports:

[Their son] John, diagnosed with severe autism at the age of three, requires constant supervision and first came to BDC at age 14 with acute behavioral problems including aggression, pica (the eating of inedible items) and self-injury. BDC’s 24-hour patient-care and college campus-sized site, his parents said, was perfect for him.

“Many residents like John have severe behavioral problems through no fault of their own,” his father told this paper, adding that BDC, established in 1973 to replace the infamous Willowbrook, was the only facility willing to accept John, also blind in his left eye. “He’s used to a routine and he’s used to the same staff. Many of them have been with him for over 20 years.”

The state’s Office for People with Developmental Disabilities announced last July that they would be shutting down the center in December 2015, one of four centers to be axed.

New York has been shutting down such large-scale institutions since closing Willowbrook in 1987, a Staten Island institution that sparked public outcry for its squalid conditions and abusive practices. In the years since, the prevailing sentiment for special needs care is that better service can be provided in smaller setting and more personalized care. The latest closures are hailed in the state’s press release by disability advocates and some family members.

But for the Cosentinos, the institution was an effective provider that met their son’s extreme needs. It will likely mean a change in those caregivers he’s had for so many years, but also a change in setting that could stress and upset their son.

In a Brooklyn Eagle article, Consentino rattled off the benefits of the current program, and the drawbacks of the group homes their son will eventually be pushed into.

“I’m worried about my son’s safety if we have to move him. BDC is a good setting for him. They do a good job of taking care of him there. BDC has nursing 24/7. He gets one-to-one coverage. It’s a nice atmosphere, too. It looks like a college campus,” Cosentino told the Brooklyn Eagle.

… “It looks like the state wants to get out of the business of taking care of the developmentally disabled. This has hurt me to the core,” Cosentino told the Eagle. “These small group homes sound nice, but they don’t have the staffing and they don’t have people trained to take care of someone with severe problems. What are they going to do if a resident gets up in the middle of the night and starts banging his head against the wall?”

The state agency that oversees such programs said the closure is the right move for most residents:

“OPWDD believes that the majority of individuals can live in the community with the right services and supports. Individuals who continue to need more intensive treatment will receive necessary services in the setting most appropriate for them, with the goal of fully integrated community supports when it is clinically appropriate,” the statement reads.

The Consentinos have launched a Change.org petition in hopes of convincing the state to keep the facility open.

This is a paid announcement from Accord Physicians Urology:

The benefits of seeking professional treatment for erectile dysfunction may seem obvious to both the patient and his partner. But what many men don’t realize is that a thorough evaluation of this condition can uncover serious threats to their health.

Dr. Vitaly Raykhman, Director of Sheepshead Bay’s Accord Physicians Urology, also known as the New York Urological Institute, says that millions of men in the United States suffer from erectile dysfunction. Typically, he said, the man can’t perform at all or is not satisfied with his sexual performance. Although the dysfunction can surface at any age, it is more common in men 50 years old or older.

The problem can be psychological or the impotence may be caused by physiological abnormalities. In such cases, he said, the dysfunction may be related to diabetes or an indication of even more serious conditions. Clinical tests done at Accord Physicians Urology can help doctors determine the reason of impotence.

“Sexual dysfunction is not just an embarrassment or inconvenience,” said Dr. Raykhman. “It is important that men who are experiencing this problem be promptly and properly evaluated by a urologist.”

Erectile dysfunction, he stressed, can be an early indicator of “metabolic syndrome,” a name given to a group of factors that raise the risk for heart disease and other health threats, including heart attack and stroke.

“The fact that they are bringing this problem into their consciousness can give a physician several years of lead time in heading off these far more serious medical problems,” said Dr. Raykhman. “Could a visit to a urologist indirectly save a patient’s life? Absolutely.”

At this time, the doctor explained, there is no cure for organic impotence. However, a skilled urologist can slow the progress of the dysfunction and with the proper treatment most patients can regain a more satisfying sexual experience.

Although surgery is sometimes necessary, “it’s the last resort.” Changes in lifestyle can often reverse the effects of erectile dysfunction. These include exercise, improvements in diet, and a reduction in smoking and alcohol intake. Erectile dysfunction can often be treated with medications such as Cialis, Viagra, Levitra or hormone therapy.

Dr. Raykhman stressed that because an erection is a vascular event, erectile dysfunction needs cannot be ignored. Fortunately, he said, for many reasons, men are no longer as reluctant to discuss this condition with a doctor as they once were.

Accord Physicians Urology is equipped to give patients a thorough evaluation and offers a wide range of treatment options. All visits are strictly confidential.

Accord Physicians Urology, 2632 East 14th Street, between Avenue Z and Shore Parkway. (347) 706-1743, . Open Monday through Friday, 9am—6pm, Saturday and Sunday 9am–3pm.

The above is a paid announcement by Accord Physicians Urology. Sheepshead Bites has not verified the claims made in this advertisement. If you own a business and would like to announce a special offer to tens of thousands of locals, e-mail us at advertising [at] sheepsheadbites [dot] com.

Source: pamhule/Flickr

D LINE

From 10:45pm to 5am, Monday to Friday, 205 St-bound D trains run express from 145 St to Tremont Av.

N LINE

There are no service advisories scheduled for this time.

R LINE

From 11:45pm to 5am, Monday to Friday, there are no R trains in Brooklyn between 59 St and 36 St—take the N. R trains run between Bay Ridge-95 St and 59 St, Brooklyn.

F LINE

From 11:45pm to 5am, Monday to Friday, 179 St-bound F trains skip Van Wyck Blvd and Sutphin Blvd.

From 12:01am to 5am, Tuesday to Friday, Coney Island-bound F trains run local from Roosevelt Av to 21 St-Queensbridge.

From 12:30am to 5am, Tuesday to Friday, 179 St-bound F trains run local from Roosevelt Av to 71 Av.

Source: Colton's office

Source: Colton’s office

The following is a press release from the offices of Assemblyman William Colton:

In a historic swearing-in ceremony, Mrs. Nancy Tong became the first Asian-American elected official in the borough of Brooklyn. On Sunday, September 21st, Nancy Tong was formally sworn-in by Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams as the Female District Leader/State Committeewoman for the 47th Assembly District at the Edith and Carl Marks Jewish Community House of Bensonhurst (JCH).

Mrs. Nancy Tong ran unopposed as the new Female District Leader and State Committeewoman for the 47th Assembly District in September 9th Democratic Primary. Since she was running unopposed for this position, Nancy automatically became the Female District Leader and State Committeewoman for the 47th Assembly District when the polls closed on primary election night. The position was previously held by Jeannette Givant, who retired after serving for ten years.

However, Mrs. Tong is celebrated this very important milestone in Brooklyn and Chinese-American history with a formal swearing-in ceremony to commemorate this historic occasion. She now is the first Asian American elected official in Brooklyn, the largest borough in New York City. Many elected officials and community leaders from across New York City and State are attended this momentous swearing-in event, including Assembly Member William Colton, Council Member Mark Tregyer, District Leader Charles Ragusa, Council Member David Greenfield, Kings County Democratic Party Chairman Frank Seddio, District Leader Ari Kagan, President of the United Chinese Association Steve Chung, and Bay Democrats President Ben Akselrod.

After coming to Bensonhurst twelve years ago, Nancy continued a family tradition of volunteering in schools and in the community, eventually becoming a volunteer at Assemblyman William Colton’s 47th Assembly District Office. Due to her hard work and dedication, Assemblyman Colton hired her as a part time Community Liaison in his office. Every year, Nancy helps more than 2,000 men and women from different cultural backgrounds in a variety of issues that affect her constituents’ quality of life.

Nancy believes she will be able to help more people and bring people of different cultural backgrounds together to improve the quality of life for individuals living in the 47th Assembly district.

District Leader Nancy Tong affirmed, “I truly enjoy helping people. It gives me great joy when I am able to help someone and make their life a little better or easier. Of course, I have to thank my family, especially my husband and my son, for all their love and support. I also have to thank Assemblyman Colton and the United Progressive Democratic Club for supporting me in becoming the first Asian-American elected official in Brooklyn. This is a historic occasion for the Asian-American community and the people of Brooklyn. I am proud of my heritage and I look forward to continue serving the people of southwest Brooklyn with my new position.”

Assemblyman Bill Colton asserted, “Nancy has a long track record of serving people in our communities. When the position opened up, I knew Nancy was the right person to become our next Female District Leader. She helps thousands of people in my office every year. Her dedication to our community is unwavering. I know she will do great things as our new Female District Leader.”

Councilman Mark Treyger stated, “Our community is incredibly fortunate to have someone like Nancy Tong fighting for us and helping to improve the quality of life for thousands of residents each year. Not only is this great news for the people of southern Brooklyn, but it is a truly historic moment for the entire borough and residents of all backgrounds who value the importance of hard work and giving back to their community. I look forward to joining the community on Sunday as Nancy is sworn into office as the first Asian-American elected official ever in Brooklyn, and to continuing my great work with her in the coming months and years on behalf of all residents of Bensonhurst, Gravesend and beyond.”

crapwater
Coney Island Creek by Cropsey Avenue is the city’s most fecal-filled waterway, according to one number-crunching analyst.

Ben Wellington, a statistics professor at Pratt Institute who runs the I Quant NY blog, pulled Department of Environmental Protection water sampling data on fecal coliform around New York City. The results? The beaches along the Coney Island peninsula are clean, at least compared to the city’s crappiest waterway – the Coney Island Creek.

Fecal coliform is bacteria that forms in mammalian intestines, and is an indicator of raw sewage in the water. It gets there when storms push so much water into the sewer drains and overwhelms the sewage system, causing the DEP to release it untreated into the rivers, oceans, bays and creeks through Combined Sewer Outflows. When the beach is closed during the summer, it’s usually because there’s an unsafe amount of sewage in the water – an amount of more than 1,000 coliform per 100ml of water.

Wellington dumped all that data into a spreadsheet and began calculating the mean, minimum, median and max levels of fecal coliform at all testing sites around the city, going back to 2008. The indicator he used to determine his top 10 dirtiest locations is the percent of days sampled that were too dirty to swim.

On that top 10 list are four Southern Brooklyn locations: Coney Island Creek at Cropsey Avenue, Coney Island Creek at its entrance, the head of Bergen Basin, near JFK airport, and the mouth of Bergen Basin.

The average amount of fecal coliform in the water at the creek when tested? It was more than 37 times the amount deemed unsafe for swimming, and it was found to be unsafe 94 percent of the times it was tested. Ugh.

Wellington mapped out his results to show us the ring of shit that encircles New York City:

 I mapped the percentage of time that water levels were unsafe for swimming.  Larger circles indicate a higher percentage of unsafe days, and thus dirtier water.  Clicking on a circle gives you fuller details for that site. 

Note that the larger circles appear more inland. The conclusion?  If you are going to swim in NYC, i guess the rule of thumb is to stay away from anything with the word “creek” in its name (and of course “canal”) and head toward the rivers. 

Source: rachelbradley.nyc/Instagram (Click to follow)

Source: rachelbradley.nyc/Instagram (Click to follow)

After a busy week, here’s a chance to catch up on some of the news happening outside of our neighborhood! We’ve pulled together some of our favorite recent stories from our sister sites, as well as some other fascinating pieces that are worth a read this weekend:

The Flatbush Frolic is this Sunday – which means music, rides, and food, food, food. [Ditmas Park Corner]

The remains of Brooklyn man killed in WWII were found, returned and buried at Arlington, 70 years after his death. [Sheepshead Bites]

A new spot is serving up the most unusual tea we’ve ever had. [Park Slope Stoop]

Clinton Hill is getting its own CrossFit gym. [Fort Greene Focus]

Remembering a wedding dress shop whose old sign was recently uncovered. [South Slope News]

Calaveras, a new Mexican restaurant, is already getting glowing reviews from neighbors. [KensingtonBK]

The Park Slope outpost of Luke’s Lobster is opening soon! [PSS]

A huge Statue of Liberty replica is being built in Sheepshead Bay. Why? “Because America. I like it.” [SB]

Should taxpayers still be footing the bill for the Mayor’s Slope home? [SSN]

Red Hook coffee roasters Brewklyn Grind opened their first café. [FGF]

Police addressed anger over tickets being given to pedestrians and bikers in Prospect Park’s Parade Grounds. [DPC]

A neighbor launched a petition to allow biking and walking through the Parade Grounds after sunset. [DPC]

For iconic Brooklyn buildings, is change welcome? [FGF]

Opinion: How The Mainstream Media Marred The West Indian American Day Carnival Parade [NY Daily News]

NYC’s libraries are in shambles. [Capital New York]

A look behind the making of Robert Caro’s momentous Robert Moses biography, “The Power Broker.” [The Daily Beast]

Video: Take a font tour of Brooklyn and Queens. [Gothamist]

The fate of LICH remains uncertain. [CNY]

In governor race, Cuomo won big in districts where turnout was small. [CNY]

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for our daily newsletter. If you have any news tips, story ideas, questions or anything else, e-mail us at editor [at] sheepsheadbites [dot] com.

(Source: High Class Realty)

Looking for a new place to call home? Bensonhurst Bean has got you covered. Our rental roundup is a new feature showcasing some of the deals on the market now. If you know of a great place available for rent or are a broker representing a property you want included, contact nberke [at] bensonhurstbean [dot] com. And if you live in or near one the places below, let neighbors know what you think in the comments.

Three Bedrooms in Bath Beach
Price: $2,100
Location: 8778 21st Avenue
Description: This apartment is in a private home and, based on the pictures, it looks spacious. The rooms face the street and they all appear to be saturated in natural light.
Contact: Svetlana Borovskiy, High Class Realty, (718) 333-0700

Two Bedrooms in Bensonhurst
Price: $1,499
Location: 8544 Bay Parkway
Description: This apartment is located in a private and it’s been renovated. The apartment is “shiny” but the realtor doesn’t specify what exactly is shiny. And, if you ask me, a shiny apartment is a bit tedious. Just think of the eye damage.
Contact: Denny, Leonidas Realty, (718) 833-4184

One Bedroom in Bensonhurst
Price: $1,400
Location: Bay Ridge Parkway and 21st Avenue
Description: Dogs aren’t allowed here but there is a used mattress, according to the pictures, so it all works out in the end. Heat and hot water are included in the rent and there are laundry machines in the building.
Contact: Michael Merola, Citi Habitats, (917) 892-6664

One Bedroom in Bensonhurst
Price: $1,000
Location: 77th Street and 19th Avenue
Description: This apartment occupies that ambiguous world between being a studio and a one bedroom. Since the toilet isn’t in the middle of the living room, we can call it a one bedroom. But it’s small. The realtor writes that it is only for a couple or a single person but you have to wonder why he felt the need to put that in the listing.
Contact: Anthony Ferraro, 4 Seasons Realty, (646) 919-0910

If you know of a great place available for rent or are a broker representing a property you want included, contact nberke [at] bensonhurstbean [dot] com.

D LINE

There are no service advisories scheduled at this time.

N LINE

From 12:01am Saturday to 5am Monday, N trains are rerouted via the R in both directions between Canal St and Atlantic Av-Barclays Ctr.

R LINE

There are no service advisories scheduled at this time.

F LINE

From 11:45pm Friday to 5am Monday, Coney Island-bound F trains skip 4 Av-9 St, 15 St-Prospect Park, and Fort Hamilton Pkwy.

From 6:45am to 7pm, Saturday and Sunday, Coney Island-bound F trains run express from Church Av to Avenue X.

All times until 5am Monday, Jamaica-bound F trains skip Van Wyck Blvd and Sutphin Blvd.