Subscribe for FREE with:

rocket1

The rocket returns! Last night, the rocket was trucked into Deno’s Wonder Wheel Park. (Photo by Charles Denson, Coney Island History Project)

For the first time in five years, the most prominent symbol of Coney Island’s Astroland – the amusement park’s iconic rocket ship – has returned to the People’s Playground for display.

The Coney Island History Project announced this morning that the Astroland Rocket Ship was trucked back into the amusement district overnight after the group assumed control of the relic several days ago.

The rocket is the only surviving space “simulators” that once proliferated in Coney Island between the early 20th Century and the space age, the Coney Island History Project said. The organization won their bid to repurpose the “Star Flyer” – as it was originally known – as the centerpiece of a new exhibit about Coney Island’s space obsession throughout history.

The Star Flyer debuted in 1962 as a three-minute, 26-seat ride that rocked and shook thrill-seekers as they watched films of rocket rides. It was taken offline years later, and was later placed on the roof of boardwalk restaurant Gregory and Paul’s where, along with the Cyclone, Parachute Jump and Wonder Wheel, it became a staple of the playground’s skyline.

rocket2

(Photo by Charles Denson, Coney Island History Project)

“Outer space simulators have played a prominent role in Coney’s amusement history,” said Charles Denson, director of the Coney Island History Project and author of Coney Island: Lost and Found. “It began when Thompson and Dundy brought ‘A Trip to the Moon’ to Steeplechase Park in 1902 and culminated in 1962, at the height of the space race, with Astroland’s Moon Rocket. The ride provided visitors with an exciting taste of intergalactic travel. The Astroland Rocket has now returned to a place of honor beside the landmark Wonder Wheel, where it will be restored as an exhibit showcasing Coney Island’s fascination with space travel.”

When Astroland closed in 2008 to make way for Luna Park, Carol and Jerry Albert, the former park’s owners, donated the rocket to the city with the promise of making the centerpiece of the new amusement district.

The city put out a request for proposals to reactivate the icon, and the History Project answered and won the bid. The rocket will be in the group’s exhibit center in Deno’s Wonder Wheel Park, and the cost of its move was covered by Carol Albert.

Wonder Wheel owners Steve and Dennis Vourderis plan to make it the centerpiece of their park’s annual celebration on August 9, and they’ll also oversee its restoration after it was seriously damaged during Superstorm Sandy. The rocket has spent most of the past five years in storage.

rocket3

(Photo by Charles Denson, Coney Island History Project)

Not only does this apartment have a corner but there are also windows. (Source: St. James Realty)

Looking for a new place to call home? Bensonhurst Bean has got you covered. Our rental roundup is a new feature showcasing some of the deals on the market now. If you know of a great place available for rent or are a broker representing a property you want included, contact nberke [at] bensonhurstbean [dot] com. And if you live in or near one the places below, let neighbors know what you think in the comments.

Two Bedrooms and an Intercom in Bensonhurst
Price: $1,400
Location: 1802 Bay Ridge Avenue
Description: With an intercom and a thermostat to control your environment, you’ll soon be saying, “beam me up, Scotty” in this fancy, modern apartment. And trains are nearby to take you “to New York City” because apparently the real estate Gods have removed Southern Brooklyn from the city (but apparently they don’t mind charging us town-folk city prices).
Contact: St. James Realty, (718) 288-2292

Three Bedrooms in Bath Beach
Price: $1,900
Location: Bay 43rd Street
Description: This apartment has two floors, a backyard and two bathrooms. It’s a really nice looking place, until you get to the bedrooms, with some carpets that seem more than a little bit out of place.
Contact: Rapid Realty Dumbo, (347) 260-6877

Two Bedrooms in Bensonhurst
Price: $1,500
Location: 80th Avenue and New Utrecht Avenue
Description: Here’s another apartment that is on a tree-lined block. I love tree-lined blocks, those not-so-rare things. The apartment has really nice wood floors with a yellow colored bedroom.
Contact: Ahmed Taha, Spire Group, (718) 290-7483

Two Bedrooms and a “Reserved Street” in Gravesend
Price: $1,600
Location: 1811 West 6th Street
Description: This “cute” newly renovated apartment is good for a new family, according to the realtor. But then who knows what to believe when the same person writes that the street is “reserved.”
Contact: Ianeeka, Fave Realty, (347) 458-8054

If you know of a great place available for rent or are a broker representing a property you want included, contact nberke [at] bensonhurstbean [dot] com.

Source: Ephox Blog

Alternate side of the street parking regulations for street cleaning purposes will be suspended tomorrow and Thursday, June 4 and June 5 in observance of the Jewish holiday of Shavuos. All other regulations, including parking meters, shall remain in effect.

You can also check out the rest of the 2014 parking calendar here.

Source: Cordey/Flickr

While others are fighting to make ferrets legal to own again in New York City, one Bensonhurst man is fighting to keep his pet alligator, Dino.

Victor Alexandria was cuffed, fined and saw his alligator confiscated last Tuesday, after authorities learned that he had been keeping the reptile in his home and in a shared backyard.

The Daily News reports:

A 3-foot-long gator was confiscated from a beastly Brooklyn man who sometimes kept the reptile with razor-sharp teeth in a wading pool in a shared yard behind his Bensonhurst digs.

Victor Alexandria, who dubbed the gator Dino and claims he’s raised the three-year-old reptile “since he fit in the palm of my hand,” was charged improper precaution of a wild animal, a misdemeanor, and with disorderly conduct for creating a hazardous condition.

Alexandria, 45, was released Thursday after a brief appearance in Brooklyn Criminal Court. He faces a $500 fine and up to year in jail if convicted.

The paper reports that Alexandria, who lives on Bay 40th Street,  is vowing to fight the city.

“It won’t cause bodily harm to anybody if you treat him the right way and you give him goldfish,” Alexandria told the paper.

Apparently, few of his immediate neighbors knew of the toothie pet kept next door. And despite Alexandria’s protestations, the paper reports he has a lengthy rap sheet for taking his pets to the boardwalk, where some, like his birds, have bitten people.

The huge stretch of 86th Street slated to see extensive pothole repairs this summer just grew by several more blocks. Councilman Vincent Gentile announced yesterday that he has allocated money to fund repaving the commercial corridor, adding a quarter mile to the project that will now see every street from Stillwell Avenue to just past the Gowanus Expressway with a fresh layer of asphalt.

The Department of Transportation had agreed last month to repair most of that stretch. According to a press release from Assemblyman William Colton and Councilman Mark Treyger, issued in early May, that agreement came about after they made requests to the agency. But the plan, covering everything from Stillwell Avenue to 14th Avenue, fell short of covering the section of roadway that passes through Dyker Heights. Gentile has now announced that the agency is on board to do the additional stretch, and his office has helped direct money towards getting the project done.

Here’s the press release:

Southwest Brooklyn continues to recover from a wicked winter and it has the battle scars to prove it. Miles of pockmarked roadways and thousands of frustrated drivers take their lumps every day over the bumpy mess that Old Man Winter left behind.

Thankfully, Deputy Leader Councilman Vincent J. Gentile has successfully brokered a deal with the Department of Transportation to repave 86th Street, one of the major commercial corridors in all of southwest Brooklyn.

The Department of Transportation has agreed to repave 86th Street from Gatling Place in Bay Ridge to Stillwell Avenue in Bensonhurst. Councilman Gentile allocated $400,000 in this year’s budget to help fund the paving.

“This is literally where the rubber meets the road,” Gentile said. “After a harsh winter, and so many potholes, 86th Street looks more like the surface of the moon than one of our most popular commercial corridors.”

The Department of Transportation plans to repair the rocky road in three separate segments this summer with repair crews working overnight in order to mitigate disruption to traffic and commerce.

“This street has been damaging cars and causing headaches for drivers for months. I am happy that the Department of Transportation is finally addressing this problem.”

If the Department of Transportation keeps to the schedule laid out in May, work should begin in August.

thunderbolt

Photo by Allen Shweky/Brooklyn Views

UPDATE (June 3, 2014): The public relations folks for the new Thunderbolt contacted us this morning to note that the opening is now being pushed to next week. They’re not sure of the date yet, but the announcement is coming soon.

Original article:

Coney Island’s newest roller coaster, Zamperla USA’s Thunderbolt, is slated to open this Friday, June 6, according to Brooklyn Views.

When first announced last year, the coaster was originally scheduled to open in time for Memorial Day. That was pushed back until just after Memorial Day, and delayed  again to this Friday.

Still, after 2.5 months of construction, the $9 million coaster is nearly ready for showtime. The three-car coaster will hold 27 people as it zooms along 2,233 feet of track at 55 miles per hour. It’ll reach its peak height at 115 feet before plummeting nearly straight to the ground and into a 100-foot vertical loop, then an 80-foot zero-g roll followed by a heartline dive and corkscrew. That two-minute ride will represent the single-largest private investment in Coney Island in decades.

Source: cgc76/Flickr

D LINE

Beginning 8:30 p.m., Monday to Thursday, Manhattan-bound D trains run local in Brooklyn from 36 St to DeKalb Av.

N LINE

Beginning 8:30 p.m., Monday to Thursday, Manhattan-bound N trains run local in Brooklyn from 59 St to DeKalb Av.

From 10 p.m. to 5 a.m., Monday to Friday, there are no N trains in Manhattan – N trains run in Queens and Brooklyn only. N service operates in two sections:

  1. Between Ditmars Blvd and Queensboro Plaza.
  2. Between Coney Island and Court St R station.

All times until October 2014: there are no N or R trains running between Court St, Brooklyn and Whitehall St, Manhattan. Late-night N (11:30 p.m. to 6 a.m.) and weekend R trains operate via the Manhattan Bridge. No service at Jay St-MetroTech, Court St, Whitehall St, Rector St, Cortlandt St, and City Hall. Use alternate service and stations on the 2, 3, 4, 5, A, or C instead.

R LINE

From 10 p.m. to 5 a.m., Monday to Friday, R service ends early in Queens, Manhattan, and Downtown Brooklyn. Take the 7, D, N, or Q to complete your trip.

All times until October 2014: there are no N or R trains running between Court St, Brooklyn and Whitehall St, Manhattan. Late-night N (11:30 p.m. to 6 a.m.) and weekend R trains operate via the Manhattan Bridge. No service at Jay St-MetroTech, Court St, Whitehall St, Rector St, Cortlandt St, and City Hall. Use alternate service and stations on the 2, 3, 4, 5, A, or C instead.

F LINE

From 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., Tuesday to Thursday, Manhattan-bound F trains skip Avenue U.

SAMSUNG

Kids got sticky with cotton candy at last year’s event. (Photo by Elle Spektor)

Bensonhurst’s 86th Street Festival is returning for yet another year this Sunday, June 8, 2014, for a day of fun, friends, food and entertainment.

More than 10,000 people flooded 86th Street between Bay Parkway and 19th Avenue for last year’s event. It’ll be on the same stretch this year as it has been for about a decade, kicking off at 11 a.m. until 5 p.m., offering a day of outdoor thrift-shopping with family and friends, as well as live music, booths representing a slew of local organizations and more.

Although the event draws a lot of outside vendors – like staple sausage trucks and tchotchke merchants – local businesses are also getting involved, said organizer Chip Cafiero.

“It’s really to bring the community out, and you will have a bunch of nonprofits out there besides the vendors,” said Cafiero. “And it’s also to rejuvenate the [local] merchants. We have a bunch participating.”

Proceeds from the event go to bettering the community. Although in past years it went to benefit a local merchant’s association, funds now go to the Southwest Brooklyn Parks Taskforce to bring concerts and other programming to local parks. Half of the proceeds also go to the 62nd Precinct Community Council, which uses it to fund graffiti removal and other quality of life improvements throughout the district.

Get there early to find parking on side streets. To get there by mass transit, take the D line to Bay Parkway or 20th Avenue, or the B1, B6 or B82 buses to Bay Parkway/86th Street.

Source: Colton's office

Source: Colton’s office

The following is a press release from Assemblyman Bill Colton’s office:

Two communities in New York City have come together to fight against the City of New York’s Solid Waste Management Plan by rallying against the proposed Gravesend Bay Marine Waste Transfer Station (1824 Shore Parkway, between Bay 41st Street & 26th Avenue). This rally was held on Sunday, June 1, at 1:00 pm at the Bay Parkway Promenade, along the water’s edge, between Caesar’s Bay Shopping Center and Bensonhurst Park, in southwest Brooklyn.

The two communities that rallyied this Sunday are southern Brooklyn, represented by the organization S.T.R.O.N.G., and the Upper East Side of Manhattan, represented by the organization Pledge2Protect. These two organizations are organizing this rally, along with the offices of Assemblyman Bill Colton, and City Councilmen Mark Treyger, Vincent Gentile, and Ben Kallos.

These two communities and groups joined at this rally to raise their opposition to the City’s Solid Waste Management Plan (SWMP). Pledge 2 Protect and S.T.R.O.N.G. both agree that this plan does not reach its mission and does not reach its objectives in helping “to equip the City with an equitable, environmentally sound, operationally efficient and cost-effective barge and rail-based solid waste transfer and export system” (Source: http://www.dec.ny.gov/chemical/8498.html). Rather, the Solid Waste Management Plan is self-defeating. The hundreds of millions of dollars that is being spent on this plan could be used in increasing the amount of recycling in the city. We believe that recycling more waste is the sounder and more efficient long-term solution – it is the real answer. Recycling trash, not dumping or transferring it is the real way to relieve burdens on residential communities.

At Sunday’s rally, there were elected officials and community leaders from both Pledge 2 Protect & the Upper East Side, and S.T.R.O.N.G. & Southern Brooklyn exposing the problems of City’s Solid Waste Management Plan. These public officials and civic leaders raised their concerns about the environmental, public health and safety issues of these two garbage station proposals. These issues will affect the quality of life of both communities of Southern Brooklyn and the Upper East Side. These two communities and organizations have come together to stop this plan, and showed their alliance at this rally in opposition to these proposed garbage stations.
S.T.R.O.N.G. (Sandy Task-Force Recovery Organized by Neighborhood Groups was founded in January 2013 by Councilman Mark Treyger in response to the devastation felt by so many families in southern Brooklyn after Hurricane Sandy. Last year, S.T.R.O.N.G. formed a coalition, titled “DUMP THE DUMP,” with community leaders, elected officials, and neighborhood organizations from across southern Brooklyn to stop this dangerous garbage station. These elected officials, organizations, and leaders are from neighborhoods including: Coney Island, Bensonhurst, Sheepshead Bay, Gravesend, Brighton Beach, Manhattan Beach, Mill Basin, Canarsie, Dyker Heights, Bath Beach, Bergen Beach, and Bay Ridge.

Also organizing this rally was Assemblyman Bill Colton (D-47th Assembly District). Assemblyman Colton has been fighting against the proposed Gravesend Bay Garbage Station since 2005, and in 2012 he filed a lawsuit to block the city’s plan to construct and operate a waste transfer station at this location, near Shore Parkway and Bay 41st Street in Bensonhurst. This location is the site of the former Southwest Brooklyn incinerator. Currently, the legal battle is continuing in court. Colton also led a successful lawsuit in the late 1980s and early 1990s to shut down the Southwest Brooklyn incinerator.

If built, this garbage station will cause serious public health, environmental, and safety concerns for neighborhoods throughout southern Brooklyn and all along the waterways of New York City and adjacent states. Some examples:

RESIDENTIAL NEIGHBORHOOD: The proposed site for the southwest Brooklyn garbage station is in the middle of a residential neighborhood, where people live, work, and play. There are many schools nearby, including 20 private and public schools within two miles from the proposed site, including the Block Institute, located at Bay 44th Street, which services children and adults with disabilities.

There are also two buildings, which house large numbers of senior citizens, including the Haym Salomon Home for Nursing & Rehabilitation, Regina Pacis Housing, and The Sephardic Home. In addition to this large population of elderly, there are many high-rise apartment and co-op buildings located near the site, including Contello Towers and Waterview Towers across the Belt Parkway, which are 17 stories tall and are home for thousands of people.

There are several NYCHA developments located in Coney Island, only a mile away from the proposed garbage station site, including Coney Island Houses, Haber Houses, Unity Towers, Carey Gardens Houses, and Gravesend Houses.

Additionally, Adventurers Amusement Park & Entertainment Center, Marine Basin Marina, and Calvert Vaux Park are located nearby.

STREET TRAFFIC: The operation of the Gravesend Bay MTS will lead to increased numbers of sanitation trucks and vehicle traffic on the surrounding streets of Bensonhurst, Bath Beach, and adjacent communities.

There is only one road leading to the proposed site (Shore Parkway, which can only be accessed by trucks via Bay Parkway), and the site is located next to the Belt Parkway and near a major shopping center. The growth in traffic congestion on these already crowded and busy streets will increase the probability of vehicular-pedestrian accidents and create noise and air pollution that will adversely affect the quality of life.

AN OVERBURDENED AREA: For 30 years, the City operated an illegal incinerator at this site; as a result, nearby residents have reported increased cases of cancer, asthma, and other serious chronic ailments. They woke up each morning to find ash from incineration on their windows. All of southern Brooklyn and its diverse communities, including minority communities of African-Americans, Hispanics, and Asians, will be negatively affected by this plan.

WORLD WAR II BOMBS – DREDGING THREAT:  The USS Bennington, a World War II aircraft barge capsized in Gravesend Bay in 1954 and dropped 1,500 live bombs (“World War II-era copper artillery shells — including one five-feet long — designed to shoot down airplanes, and about 1,500 large-caliber machine-gun shells designed to explode on contact” source: http://nypost.com/2010/10/24/diver-has-blast-with-historic-discovery/) to the bottom of the highly turbulent water.  Professional divers have confirmed that such a large number of munitions, which can explode upon impact, lie at the bottom of the Bay. Specialists have confirmed that the action of dredging can indeed ignite a catastrophic explosion of numerous bombs at once causing untold damage to property and wildlife and possible deaths.

TOXIC CHEMICALS – DREDGING THREAT: There are highly-concentrated amounts of extremely toxic chemicals such as mercury, lead, and arsenic, as well as now-outlawed insecticides and pesticides such as Mirex buried by sand and silt at the bottom of Gravesend Bay.  These chemicals, which threaten the health of nearby residents every day were spewed into these waters by the City through the operation of the closed incinerator.  To build this garbage station, the City has confirmed they will need to dredge the bottom of Gravesend Bay repeatedly, which will release these toxic chemicals into the air and water.

Assemblyman William Colton (D-47th Assembly District) funded a study of the Gravesend Bay floor bed, and scientists confirmed the high levels of dangerous toxins.  “Black mayonnaise,” was the term used by scientists in their analysis to describe the condition of the sand at the bottom of Gravesend Bay. The samples were taken from the top few inches of the bay floor bed, not a deep dig. Dredging will go several feet down into the decades of dangerous debris, bringing it to the surface, where it will travel along with the water’s current into other areas and to the shoreline.  In 2012, before Hurricane Sandy hit, the NYC Department of Sanitation conducted a sediment sampling study of the bottom of Gravesend Bay. It found Type C Acutely Toxic Levels of Mercury, PCBs, Lead, Dieldrin, Chlordane, and Arsenic, and Type B Hazardously Toxic Levels of Lead, Cadmium, Dioxins, Mirex, and insecticides, among others, in the dredging area.

FLOOD ZONE:  This site has been designated Zone 1 on the NYC Hurricane Evacuation Map and Zone A by FEMA, which describes this as a high-risk area with a 1 in 4 chance of flooding.  This site was severely flooded during Super-storm Sandy.  Another storm of that strength or possibly lesser, will cause extensive flooding of this proposed Gravesend site, sending the trash into homes, schools, nursing homes, and shared public spaces. In addition to the fears brought from mold, Brooklynites will need to worry about the garbage and toxic chemicals that have flooded their properties and neighborhoods.

WATER AND BEACH POLLUTION: The people of Bensonhurst and Bath Beach will not be the only ones affected by this garbage station.  Gravesend Bay is connected to Coney Island Creek, as well as the waters along Seagate, Coney Island, Brighton Beach, Sheepshead Bay, Mill Basin, Manhattan Beach and the Atlantic Ocean.  Toxic chemicals, debris and garbage from this pollution will spread out far beyond the boundaries of New York City.

Keep reading for statements from the elected officials, and for a list of coalition members.

Source: Colton's office

From a 2013 rally against the station (Source: Colton’s office)

It’s been a while since we’ve heard an update on the Gravesend Bay Waste Transfer Station, a Department of Sanitation plan to place a facility for trucks to transfer garbage to barges near Ceasar’s Bay.

The plan has been heatedly opposed by local pols and the community, and even the subject of a lawsuit alleging that toxic chemicals from a former garbage incinerator at the site, long-buried in the sea floor, would be dredged up and pose a health risk to residents. The lawsuit was squashed by a State Supreme Court judge, but rallies continued last year until election season passed.

Now the issue is back. This Sunday, June 1, at 1 p.m. on the Bay Parkway Promenade at Ceasar’s Bay, a coalition of elected officials and community groups led by Assemblyman William Colton and Councilman Mark Treyger will gather again to express their opposition. They also say they’ll continue the legal battle.

Their focus has expanded though. The local coalition, called S.T.R.O.N.G. is teaming up with Pledge 2 Protect, a group battling a similar proposal on the Upper East Side. Together they’re raising their opposition to the city’s Solid Waste Management Plan, the city’s long-term vision to “equip the City with an equitable, environmentally sound, operationally efficient and cost-effective barge and rail-based solid waste transfer and export system.” That plan is where the waste transfer stations were first proposed.

The groups say the proposals fail to meet the plan’s mission, and instead waste millions of dollars that could be better spent expanding recycling programs. “Reclycling trash, not dumping or transferring it is the real way to relieve burdens on residential community,” the groups state in a press release.

S.T.R.O.N.G. has put out an eight-point statement of their opposition to the plan. It’s below. The TL;DR version? It’s a threat to quality of life, health, safety and the environment.

1) The operating of the southwest Brooklyn marine waste transfer station will lead to increased vehicle traffic on the surrounding streets of Bensonhurst, Bath Beach, and beyond. There will be an increase in the number of sanitation trucks carrying garbage in our community’s streets. There is only one road which leads to the proposed site (Shore Parkway, which can only be accessed by trucks by Bay Parkway), and the site is located next to the Belt Parkway and near a major shopping center. The increase in truck traffic and congestion on these already crowded and busy streets will adversely affect the quality of life for people in our neighborhoods.

2) The proposed site for the southwest Brooklyn garbage station is in the middle of a residential neighborhood, where people live, work, and play. There are several schools nearby to the site, including the Block Institute, located at Bay 44th Street, which services children and adults with disabilities. Additionally, Adventurers Amusement Park & Entertainment Center, Marine Basin Marina, and Calvert Vaux Park is located nearby as well, which is used by many for recreational, boating, and sports activities. There are also two buildings which house large numbers of senior citizens, including the Haym Salomon Home for Nursing & Rehabilitation and Regina Panic Housing. In addition to this large population of elderly people, there are many high-rise apartment and co-op buildings located near the location, including Contello Towers and Waterview Towers across the Belt Parkway, which are seventeen stories tall and serve as the home for thousands of people.

3) The people of Bensonhurst and Bath Beach will not be the only ones who are affected by this garbage station plan. Gravesend Bay is connected to Coney Island Creek, as well as the waters on the shores of the communities Seagate, Coney Island, Brighton Beach, and Manhattan Beach. All of southern Brooklyn and its diverse communities, including minorut communities of African-Americans, Hispanics, and Asians, will be negatively impacted by this plan. For example, there are several NYCHA developments located in Coney Island, only a mile away from the proposed garbage station site, including Coney Island Houses, Haber Houses, Unity Towers, Carey Gardens Houses, and Gravesend Houses.

4)  The former southwest Brooklyn incinerator was operated at the site for the proposed marine waste transfer station. People near the former incinerator have suffered enough at the hands of the city’s reckless waste management. Residents near the former incinerator have reported increased cases of cancer, asthma, and other serious chronic ailments. They woke up each morning to find ash from incineration on their windows.  As we are still reeling from the aftermath of 30 years of illegal incineration, we cannot allow another dangerous plan to move forward and wreak further havoc on Southwest Brooklyn’s residents and environment.

5) In 1954, a capsized barge from a World War II aircraft carrier named the USS Bennington dispersed 1,500 live munitions at the bottom of Gravesend Bay that the ship was carrying during its tour of duty. Professional divers have confirmed that such a large number of munitions, which can explode upon impact, lie at the bottom of the Bay. These live munitions are scattered across Gravesend Bay leaving many concerned that the repeated dredging of the bay can unleash explosive consequences to the safety of residents and wildlife nearby.

6) There are highly concentrated amounts of extremely toxic chemicals such as mercury, lead, and arsenic, as well as now-outlawed insecticides and pesticides such as Mirex, that are buried at the bottom of Gravesend Bay after being spewed into these waters by the former southwest Brooklyn incinerator. To build this garbage station, the bottom of Gravesend Bay would need to be dredged repeatedly, releasing these toxic chemicals into Gravesend Bay, as well as the surrounding waters of Coney Island Creek, Sheepshead Bay, Mill Basin, as well as Coney Island, Manhattan, and Brighton Beaches.

7) The site of this planned garbage station is landfill and located in a flood zone (“Zone 1” according NYC Hurricane Evacuation Map, and “High risk, Special Flood Hazard Area – Zone A” according to FEMA). FEMA states that this high-risk flood area has a 1 in 4 chance of flooding within the next thirty years. This site was severely flooded with several feet of water by Superstorm Sandy. If this garbage station is built and opened, when there is another large coastal storm like Superstorm Sandy that causes large amounts of flooding from storm surges, the trash from the facility and the toxic chemicals at the bottom of Gravesend Bay will end up in our homes, schools, nursing homes, and shared public spaces. It won’t just be mold people will have to worry about cleaning from their homes and basements, but toxic chemicals and garbage as well.

8) After learning that the bottom of Gravesend Bay is littered with toxins spewed out by the former incinerator, Colton funded a study of the bay’s surface and the results were alarming. “Black mayonnaise,” was the term used by scientists in their analysis of what they observed in the surface samples. Scientists have confirmed what many in the community feared… There were unsafe levels of mercury and other harmful toxins found at the bottom of Gravesend Bay. The samples were taken by just scratching the surface rather than by digging deep below the surface where the dredging will reach.

In addition to Colton and Treyger, the protest will be attended by Congressman Michael Grimm, Council members Vincent Gentile, David Greenfield, and Ben Kallos and Democratic District Leader Ari Kagan.

Correction: The original version of this post mistakenly stated in the headline that the rally was on Saturday. It was on Sunday. Our sincere apologies to the organizers for this error.