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Archive for the tag 'parking'

Source: Ephox Blog

Alternate side parking regulations will be suspended Thursday and Friday, October 16 and 17, for Shemini Atzereth and Simchas Torah. All other regulations, including parking meters, remain in effect.

You can check out the rest of the 2014 parking calendar here.

Hag Sameah, Bensonhurst!

Source: Ephox Blog

Alternate side parking regulations will be suspended Thursday and Friday, October 9 and 10, for Succoth. All other regulations, including parking meters, remain in effect.

You can check out the rest of the 2014 parking calendar here.

Happy Succoth, Bensonhurst!

Source: Ephox Blog

Alternate side parking regulations will be suspended Thursday and Friday, September 25 and 26, for Rosh Hashanah. All other regulations, including parking meters, remain in effect.

You can check out the rest of the 2014 parking calendar here.

L’shana tova, Sheepshead Bay!

Source: Brandon Ungar / Flickr

Source: Brandon Ungar / Flickr

Alternate side parking (street cleaning) regulations will be suspended Friday, August 15 in observance of the Feast of the Assumption. All other regulations, including parking meters, shall remain in effect.

You can download your own 2013 Alternate Side Parking Suspension calendar by going here.

Eid a Fitr is also called the Sweet Festival for all the yummy sweets (Source: Wikimedia Commons)

Alternate side parking regulations are suspended Monday through Wednesday, July 28 to 30 for Eid al-Fitr, and there will be no street cleaning on those days.

All other regulations, including parking meters, remain in effect.

Eid al-Fitr marks the end of Ramadan and is celebrated by Muslims worldwide. After fasting from dawn to sunset the previous month, Muslims are not permitted to fast during Eid al-Fitr and usually attend large celebrations full of food and gifts. It’s one of the most important festivals on the Islamic calendar.

You can download your own 2014 Alternate Side Parking Suspension calendar from the NYC DOT’s website.

Source: DOT

Streetsblog managing editor Brad Aaron wrote a post last week claiming that a Department of Transportation rule change fought for by Councilman Vincent Gentile is making streets less safe, but the councilman is standing by the decision.

The rule in question was adopted in 2009, allowing drivers to park at T intersections, and making it legal to block crosswalks where there are no traffic signals, painted lines or stop signs.

In addition to creating more parking spaces, Gentile argued at the time that it made the streets safer for pedestrians, since there were no indications to drivers that a crosswalk was there and thus no reason to slow down.

But according to Aaron, the unmarked crosswalks are statistically safer, and by allowing cars to block them off the city is pushing pedestrians to more dangerous crosswalks.

[A]ccording to an NYU Langone Medical Center study of Bellevue trauma patients, more pedestrians are injured while crossing in crosswalks with “walk” signals than while crossing mid-block or against the signal. Data mapped by Transportation Alternatives’ CrashStat show that, between 1995 and 2009, there were no pedestrian-involved crashes at Seaman and Payson, while the two closest signalized intersections saw a handful of injury crashes each.

Has blocking unmarked crosswalks — which are natural walking paths — stopped people from using them? No, but it has worsened sight lines, making it harder for drivers and pedestrians to see each other. What the city should be doing is daylighting space next to pedestrian curb ramps — the opposite of the Gentile rule.

The data cited appears to suggest that unmarked crosswalks or crossing in the middle of the street is safer, but a closer look at the source material seems to upend that. The data was pulled from 1,400 pedestrians and cyclists treated at Bellevue for collisions between 2008 and 2011. As the New York Times reported:

Of those injured on the street, 44 percent used a crosswalk, with the signal, compared with 23 percent who crossed midblock and 9 percent who crossed against the signal.

But the research makes no correlation, and seems to only suggest that pedestrian-related accidents happen where pedestrians are more likely to be – ie. marked crosswalks with a signal. It does not suggest that crossing mid-block is safer, just that less people were treated for injuries sustained doing so – which makes sense since fewer people are likely to do that in the “busiest corridors” in Manhattan and western Brooklyn, where most of the patients were injured.

Aaron didn’t turn to Gentile for a response, so we did.

Back in 2008, Department of Transportation engineers took a long hard look at unregulated “T” intersections. Even though these areas had been outfitted with pedestrian ramps, there was no denying their dangerous design due to the lack of marked crosswalks, signals, signage or other traffic control devices. In addition, inadequate sight distances made these intersections extremely unsafe, especially for the disabled. As a result of these findings, the Dept. of Transportation amended the rules which also allowed for drivers to park in these newly redefined areas. Since then, I have done my best to promote and publicize the existence of this obscure rule change because it first and foremost helps keeps pedestrians safe and creates a few more parking spots in the process. I continue to work closely with the Dept. of Transportation towards making our streets a safe place where pedestrians, cyclists and drivers can all co-exist responsibly.

Source: Ephox Blog

Alternate side of the street parking regulations for street cleaning purposes will be suspended tomorrow and Thursday, June 4 and June 5 in observance of the Jewish holiday of Shavuos. All other regulations, including parking meters, shall remain in effect.

You can also check out the rest of the 2014 parking calendar here.

Source: Dara Skolnick/Flickr

Alternate side parking regulations will be suspended Monday and Tuesday for Passover.

All other regulations, including parking meters, remain in effect.

You can download your own 2014 Alternate Side Parking Suspension calendar from the NYC DOT’s website.

Source: Dara Skolnick/Flickr

Alternate side parking regulations will be suspended Tuesday through Friday, April 15 to 18 for Passover, Holy Thursday, and Good Friday. Wednesday is the anniversary of the Rush-Bagot Treaty, establishing the border between the United States and Canada, and we think the Department of Transportation is also looking to honor this, although they have not said so.

All other regulations, including parking meters, remain in effect.

You can download your own 2014 Alternate Side Parking Suspension calendar from the NYC DOT’s website.

Source: Streetsblog

Officers from the 62nd Precinct, covering Bensonhurst, Bath Beach, Dyker Heights and parts of Gravesend and Borough Park, are warning drivers of an impending crackdown on double parking throughout the command.

Police have been distributing fliers about the crackdown, dubbed “Operation Move Along,” noting that fines for double parking violations are $115.

“When you double park, you obstruct the views of other drivers, pedestrians and cyclists; you impede traffic flow; you increase the chance of a collision,” the flier said. “Don’t be the cause of a collision or injury or death to somebody’s loved one. Please be considerate.”

The Bensonhurst precinct isn’t the only one to partake in the crackdown. Cops will also be writing tickets to double-parkers in Midtown Manhattan’s 34th Precinct, the Bronx’s 40th Precinct, Crown Height’s 77th Precinct, as well as two precincts in Queens and one in Staten Island.

The crackdown will last until March 16.

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