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Archive for the tag 'police'

The stabbing happened near La Parranda bar. Source: Google Maps

The two men convicted of a fatal 2012 stabbing of an innocent man on 86th Street were sentenced yesterday to 25 years to life.

As we reported earlier this month:

Migel Juarex, 26, of New Utrecht Avenue and Gilberto Serrano, 25, of Queens approached Abel Xochimitl early in the morning of July 14, 2012, stabbing him to death outside of La Parranda bar at 2366 86th Street. The men believed Xochimitl to be a part of a rival gang, although investigators later found that he had no such ties.

According to testimony, the two men approached Xochimitl near Bay 35th Street and asked him “Que barrio?” The phrase literally means “What neighborhood?” but also means “What gang do you belong to?”

Xochimitl answered by saying “Panchito. Brighton Beach,” causing the defendents to attack him with a broken bottle and knife, stabbing him in the face, neck, chest and back. Xochimitl bled to death on the street.

Juarex and Serrano have each been sentenced to 25 years to life in prison after being convicted of second-degree murder at a trial in which they each had separate juries.

Source: NYPD

Source: NYPD

Cops are on the hunt for a Coney Island chain snatcher that attacked and robbed a 54-year-old woman, leaving her with lacerations to her head.

The thug was caught on NYPD-operated surveillance cameras at approximately 1:00 p.m. as he walked up Mermaid Avenue on Friday, July 18. After crossing West 31st Street, the suspect passed a bus stop where the victim was waiting in line. He walked further up the street and circled back. As he came beside her, he ripped off her necklace and caused her to fall forward as he ran off. The woman fell on her face, and had to be taken to Coney Island Hospital to be treated for cuts to her head.

The thief is described as a black male in his 30s, 5-foot-7-inches, last scene wearing a white shirt, dark short and white sneakers.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at (800) 577-TIPS (8477). The public can also submit their tips by logging onto the Crime Stoppers website, or by texting their tips to 274637 (CRIMES) then enter TIP577.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

CompStat reports are produced by the New York Police Department on a weekly basis. We publish the week’s statistics for the 62nd Precinct reports every Friday. The 62nd Precinct is the police command responsible for Bensonhurst and Bath Beach.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

CompStat reports are produced by the New York Police Department on a weekly basis. We publish the week’s statistics for the 62nd Precinct reports every Friday. The 62nd Precinct is the police command responsible for Bensonhurst and Bath Beach.

Source: jasoneppinke via Flickr

Source: jasoneppinke/Flickr

Following another spate of suicides off of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge and other metro-area spans, the New York Police Department is training a larger batch of officers to safely get jumpers down – by persuasion or by force.

The New York Post reports:

So far this year, there have been 11 suicides at the George Washington Bridge, compared with 15 for all of last year. That’s in addition to 40 other attempted suicides stopped by cops on the span.

Given the alarming numbers, the department is training more officers to deal with jumpers — including sending more of them to practice climbing the structures, including the Verrazano Bridge.

So if you see some cops climbing around up there like Spiderman, know that it’s all to keep you safe from yourself.

If you’re wondering what else the training entails, or what life is like as one of the cops on the Jumper Squad, check out this awesome – and chilling - profile from 2012 in the New York Times.

Source: mikey k/Flickr

Source: mikey k/Flickr

Police took a 54-year-old man into custody on Saturday after finding the body of his 62-year-old brother in the bathtub of his Luna Park co-op, with chemical burns to his chest and leg.

Cops were called to the scene at 8:46 a.m. following a 911 call for a man in need of help. It’s unclear who called the police, but when they arrived at the ninth floor apartment at 2819 West 12th Street the man attempted to block their entrance.

After a struggle, they restrained the man who authorities described as emotionally disturbed.

Once inside, cops discovered the unconscious and unresponsive body in the bathtub and called EMS. Medical responders declared him dead at the scene, and told the police that the male had chemical burns to the chest and leg.

The 54-year-old was taken to Staten Island University Hospital for psychological evaluation and treatment of chemical burns on his arms.

Neither of the men were identified by police, and the 54-year-old has not been charged with a crime.

The New York Times identified the two as brothers, and police told the paper that they’re struggling to get answers from the surviving sibling.

“Some of the stuff he’s saying doesn’t make sense,” a police department spokesman said.

The medical examiner will determine the cause of the death, and police are still investigating.

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

CompStat reports are produced by the New York Police Department on a weekly basis. We publish the week’s statistics for the 62nd Precinct reports every Friday. The 62nd Precinct is the police command responsible for Bensonhurst and Bath Beach.

Bay View Houses (Source: Google Maps)

Bay View Houses (Source: Google Maps)

Lawrence Walden, 27, was found shot in the head last night outside of Coney Island’s Bay View Houses, across from Kaiser Park.

Police were called to 3112 Bay View Avenue at approximately 9:30 p.m. Thursday after being tipped off to an assault. They arrived to find Walden sprawled across the housing project’s walkway. He had suffered a gunshot wound to the head.

Unresponsive and unconscious, EMS rushed Walden to Coney Island Hospital where he was pronounced dead.

No arrests were made, and the investigation is ongoing.

Walden’s listed address, according to police, is on Howard Avenue on the Crown Heights – Brownsville border.

As of June 29, the 60th Precinct, which covers Coney Island, Brighton Beach and Gravesend, has seen nine shooting incidents in 2014, with 11 victims. It’s a decrease from this time last year, when the precinct saw 13 incidents with 18 victims.

The stabbing happened near La Parranda bar. Source: Google Maps

Two gangbangers, including one from Bensonhurst, face 25 years to life in prison after they were found guilty of stabbing a man and leaving him to bleed to death on 86th Street in 2012.

Migel Juarex, 26, of New Utrecht Avenue and Gilberto Serrano, 25, of Queens approached Abel Xochimitl early in the morning of July 14, 2012, stabbing him to death outside of La Parranda bar at 2366 86th Street. The men believed Xochimitl to be a part of a rival gang, although investigators later found that he had no such ties.

According to testimony, the two men approached Xochimitl near Bay 35th Street and asked him “Que barrio?” The phrase literally means “What neighborhood?” but also means “What gang do you belong to?”

Xochimitl answered by saying “Panchito. Brighton Beach,” causing the defendents to attack him with a broken bottle and knife, stabbing him in the face, neck, chest and back. Xochimitl bled to death on the street.

“Abel Xochimitl was an innocent young man whose life was senselessly and viciously taken by the defendants. The victim was not a gang member, unlike the defendants, who now face spending many years of their lives in prison for this heinous act,” said Brooklyn District Attorney Ken Thompson.

The two men will be sentenced for second degree murder later this month.

Source: smokershighlife/Flickr

Brooklyn District Attorney Ken Thompson announced Tuesday that his office will no longer prosecute first-time offenders arrested for low-level misdemeanor marijuana possession charges, suggesting it’s been a waste of resources that unfairly targets young men of color.

The DA laid out the new policy in a press release, saying that he will decline to prosecute marijuana cases where the defendent has no prior arrests or a minimal criminal record, and has given authorities a verifiable name and address. However, his office also provided a list of exceptions that may be prosecuted. The exceptions include cases where a defendant is nabbed smoking in public, is a sex offender, has an open warrant or the marijuana is found as a result of search warrant.

Here’s Thompson’s full statement:

“My office and the New York City Police Department have a shared mission to protect the public and we will continue to advance that goal. But as District Attorney, I have the additional duty to do justice, and not merely convict, and to reform and improve our criminal justice system in Brooklyn,” District Attorney Thompson said.

“This new policy is a reasonable response to the thousands of low-level marijuana arrests that weigh down the criminal justice system, require significant resources that could be redirected to more serious crimes and take an unnecessary toll on offenders. Pursuant to this policy, we will use our prosecutorial discretion to decline to prosecute, and dismiss upfront, certain low-level marijuana possession cases based on criteria concerning the particular individual and the circumstances of the case. For example, cases will be dismissed prior to arraignment for those with little or no criminal record, but we will continue to prosecute marijuana cases which most clearly raise public health and safety concerns.

“This policy does not express approval for the use of marijuana and should not be interpreted as such. The policy will not apply to those who smoke marijuana in public, or in the presence of children. It will not apply to 16 and 17-year-old offenders, who instead will be redirected on to a healthier path through a diversion program. It will not apply to those with a serious criminal history, to those who are known to act in a dangerous manner while under the influence, or to those who have a history of selling drugs to children,” District Attorney Thompson said.

“If the conduct in which the offender has engaged is the mere possession of a small amount of marijuana in public, it would not, under most circumstances, warrant saddling that offender with a new criminal conviction and all of its attendant collateral consequences related to employment, education and housing,” the District Attorney said.

“Furthermore, in 2013, this office processed well over 8,500 cases where the top charge was a class ‘B’ misdemeanor marijuana possession. More than two-thirds of those cases ended up being dismissed by judges, most often because the defendant was offered an adjournment in contemplation of dismissal at his or her criminal court arraignment. The processing of these cases exacts a cost on the criminal justice system and takes a toll on the individual. Given that these cases are ultimately — and predictably — dismissed, the burdens that they pose on the system and the individual are difficult to justify. We are pouring money into an endeavor that produces no public safety benefit,” the District Attorney added.

The news of Thompson’s decision will not mean a policy shift for the New York Police Department. Regardless of prosecution, possessing marijuana remains illegal, and NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton said the announcement “will not result in any changes” at the department, suggesting cops will still make the bust.

Meanwhile, state lawmakers proposed the Fairness and Equity Act yesterday, which seeks to implement the spirit of Thompson’s decision statewide. The act aims to address racial disparities in the arrests by slashing the penalty for possession from a misdemeanor to a violation that carries a fine. It would also allow those previously convicted of possession to clear their record.

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