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Archive for the tag 'schools'

The following is a paid announcement from the MBBC / Nash Jew After School Program (330 Neptune Avenue, 3rd Floor):

after-school

It’s back to school season and once again homework, studying and the daily routine begins. Let MBBC/Nash Jew after school make it easier for you. We offer one-on-one help with each student, as well as provide hot lunch and transportation. Our after school program goes beyond the classroom, and we also offer dance, art, karate, chess, music and vocal classes. We are located at 330 Neptune Avenue. Registering with us will help you make the school year an easier and more enjoyable experience for your child!

We now have a wide range of all-new programs, many available through MBBC/Nash Jew After School for the first time this year. Our programs include:

  • Yoga classes for all ages, including adults
  • Music and vocal programs
  • Judo, sambo and MMA
  • Tutoring and test preparation
  • Sunday school

MBBC offers it all in one place and at exceptional rates.

But don’t take our word for it. Here’s what one parent had to say about their experience:

MBBC/Nash Jew After School is great in all aspects. My daughter has been attending MBBC’s after school program for three years. Besides completing all of her homework in the program, she enjoys personalized attention from teachers and counselors. Every person working in the program greets us with a smile and positive attitude. Every day, they provide kids with different activities: gymnastics, dancing, chess, arts, and after, she can stay for additional training in a program she enjoys most. For my daughter, it’s dancing and gymnastics. All instruction is available in both English and Russian, which allows my daughter to learn Russian language and use it more. Any time I had a problem picking my daughter up, transportation was available. If she felt sick, I was called immediately. I will definitely use MBBC for years to come and recommend it to everyone.

– Natalie Chernikova – mother of Nastya Berard, student

Our programs are designed for students in pre-kindergarten to middle school, and is certified by the New York State Department of Family and Children Services.

WE’RE HIRING: MBBC/Nash Jew After School is seeking candidates for the following positions: after-school teachers (certified, or certificate pending); karate, judo and sambo instructors; yoga instructors. Please e-mail a resume to: mbbcschool@gmail.com.

Call (718) 891-1111 or visit our website to sign up now!

The above is a paid announcement by MBBC/Nash Jew After School Program. Sheepshead Bites has not verified the claims made in this advertisement. If you own a business and would like to announce a special offer to tens of thousands of locals, e-mail us at advertising [at] sheepsheadbites [dot] com.

Sunny Skies

Source: Sunny Skies

Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced the preliminary recipients of $340 million in pre-kindergarten funding yesterday. While none are in the Bensonhurst area, there are two in Borough Park - Mothers Love and Sunny Skies DC Corp.

Provided state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli approves the awards, Mothers Love (1681 49th Street) will land $214,287 from the state and Sunny Skies DC (4228 10th Avenue) will receive $500,000 as part of a program that is awarding hundreds of millions of dollars in funding for 81 school districts and community-based organizations across the state.

The funding, which is included in the 2014-15 state budget, is the first installment in the governor’s commitment to invest $1.5 billion over the next five years to build a statewide universal full-day pre-kindergarten program.

The city Department of Education is slated to land nearly $300 million to build its universal pre-kindergarten program for all 4-year-olds in the city – which stems from Cuomo’s promise to pay for such a program in lieu of Mayor Bill de Blasio raising taxes to pay for it, as the mayor had originally aimed to do upon taking office.

The funds slated for private daycare operators are to fill the gap in the number of seats required to meet the need, which the Department of Education alone does not have the space for.

“Training and educating young minds is one of the smartest investments we can make as a state, as studies demonstrate that pre-kindergarten has a long lasting, positive influence on our children’s education and future success,” Cuomo said in his press release. “The state budget this year included a major investment in early education, putting New York state on the path to become just the fourth state in the nation to establish universal full day pre-K. The awards we are announcing today will enable tens of thousands of children to attend pre-K classes, and represent another step in the State’s work to prepare our students to compete in the 21st century economy.”

As part of state and city officials push for a full-day pre-kindergarten program, numerous lawmakers and educators, including Cuomo and de Blasio, stressed that studies have shown that children who participate in early education programs are more likely to read at grade level and graduate from high school than those who do not.

“We are proud to have Governor Cuomo as a strong partner in making pre-K for All a reality for the children of New York City,” de Blasio said in the same release. “This funding represents a powerful commitment by the State to build a new, stronger education foundation that will transform our schools. We are working tirelessly to make good on this opportunity to deliver new pre-K options, improve existing ones and build a high-quality system that lifts up every child.”

The full list of recipients of the $340 million is available here.

school classroom by Dan Nguyen

A new, more inclusionary approach to educate NYC students with special needs is proving easier said than done, says a new report by Chalkbeat. The organization spoke to students, parents, and school officials and found that schools are struggling to implement mandatory reforms to special education, while its effect on students is still unproven.

Integrating special needs students by enrolling them in general education classes, mixed classes (including typical and special needs students), or a combination of the two, was an idea first publicly introduced in 2003 by then-Mayor Michael Bloomberg. The proposal was launched as a pilot at a limited number of city schools in 2010, and launched citywide in 2012. Chalkbeat, though, found that some schools lacked the resources and the scramble to implementation is leaving some of the neediest students behind.

Students affected by this Special Education Reform and interviewed by Chalkbeat each had unique experiences, some positive, some not. They include Joseph, a middle schooler with ADHD who was placed in mixed classes as per the city’s new policies, and for whom no purely special education classes were available when attempts to mainstream proved unsuccessful; Noah, whose mother Britt Sady pushed for his inclusion in a general education class so as to set higher standards for his learning and increase his chances of graduation; Christon Solomon, a middle schooler who says small learning sessions in special education classes work better for him than general education; and Thomas, who was suspended often in special education classes, but is doing better since being introduced to mainstream and mixed classes.

The experiences of parents and kids profiled are diverse, as are the abilities of the schools discussed to see that students’ needs are met–often, says Chalkbeat, schools simply aren’t provided with adequate staffing or financial resources to abide by the 2012 reforms. This is the case with Joseph–whose transfer to another school was finally approved only near the end of the school year, and presumably because his mother Clara, who works for the Department of Education, came armed with a certain amount of knowledge regarding red tape.

“Sometimes, if the parent doesn’t question [a school's inadequate handling of a special needs child's education], it just goes under the radar,” family advocate Olga Vazquez, of mental illness and developmental disability service support agency ICL, told the publication.

Certain schools are benefitting from reforms more than others. The article says funding is disproportionately doled out to schools with integrated classrooms instead of simply general and special education ones, and parents of both typical and special needs students at Harlem’s P.S. 112, for example, have requested mixed classes to enhance their kids’ educational experiences.

However the jury is still out, quantitatively speaking, on the effectiveness of integrating kids of different abilities into the same classrooms. Chalkbeat says some test scores have increased marginally, but others have not. What does appear to be clear is a widening discrepancy in disciplinary action being handed down to special needs students in mainstream classrooms, but DOE Deputy Chancellor Corinne Rello-Anselmi says Chancellor Carmen Fariña has no plans to overhaul the 2012 reforms.

If you’re an New York City educator or parent, what’s your take on the matter? Have you run into any of the problems stated in Chalkbeat’s article, or seen students improve under new policies? Should properly run mixed classrooms benefit all students–and what would running them properly entail of schools, teachers, and the DOE? How would funding and resources be distributed if you had it your way?

Photo by Dan Nguyen

golden

The following is a press release from Cablevision:

With a focus on promoting reading and literacy, Cablevision’s Optimum and Madison Square Garden today brought the 8th Annual Knicks Summer Reading Program to P.S. 112 for young campers (ages 6-10) attending the Neighborhood Improvement Association (NIA) Summer Day Camp. Participating in the event was New York State Senator Martin Golden, along with former NBA superstar and Knicks Alumni Relations and Fan Development Advisor John Starks.

After welcoming remarks, Senator Golden and John Starks spoke about the importance of literacy. They also read aloud from the popular children’s book, Allie’s Basketball Dream by Barbara E. Barber. Following the reading, the children took part in a fun, interactive quiz about the book and participated in a raffle and autograph session. The children were also given a copy of the book discussed.

“Reading not only teaches it stimulates the imagination, strengthens self-confidence and fosters creativity, providing lifelong rewards,” said Senator Golden. “I congratulate Optimum and Madison Square Garden for this innovative program that engages young minds in such a positive way and helps instill a love of literature in students from an early age.”

“For eight years, Cablevision, in conjunction with Madison Square Garden has promoted reading programs in the communities we serve through its Summer Reading initiative,” said Jennifer Ostrager, Cablevision Vice President of Public Affairs. “Programs such as this serve as a catalyst for instilling a lifelong love of reading.”

Targeted to children ages 6-12, the Knicks Summer Reading initiative consists of a series of reading events at libraries, camps and community centers throughout the New York/New Jersey metro area. The program encourages reading through the use of incentives and is highlighted by book giveaways, ticket raffles, free t-shirts and read-aloud events with Knicks alumni and elected officials at select locations.

Councilman Mark Treyger

Councilman Mark Treyger

The following is a press release from the offices of Councilman Mark Treyger:

To help make sure that every parent has an opportunity to enroll their child in a pre-kindergarten program for this coming school year, Council Member Mark Treyger is hosting a NYC Department of Education enrollment specialist at his Bensonhurst district office (2015 Stillwell Avenue) this Monday, August 11, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

The enrollment specialist will help provide parents with information needed to enroll their children in free pre-kindergarten programs in local public schools or community-based organizations for the 2014-2015 school year. In order to serve the entire community, interpreters will be available to assist parents who speak Spanish, Russian or Chinese. All New York City children who were born in 2010 and turn four years old by December 31 are eligible to enroll this year. As a former public school teacher for eight years before taking office, Council Member Treyger is urging all parents of eligible children to take advantage of this great chance to have their child enrolled in a free program right in the community.

“As a former educator, I am thrilled that our city is making these vital pre-kindergarten programs a priority for our children. This is a great opportunity to give your child a head start and a great foundation for their education. I am hosting this service to make sure that every family has the information needed to make an informed decision for their child and get them enrolled in a program for the coming school year. Anyone who hasn’t yet located a suitable program should stop by Monday’s information session for information about the different options available for local families,” said Council Member Treyger.

In addition, Council Member Treyger is publicly thanking Assembly Members Bill Colton and Alec Brook-Krasny, Senator Diane Savino and all of his colleagues in state government for passing a budget that provides funding for this critical city initiative.

For more information, please visit www.nyc.gov/prek or contact Dilyora Rahimova in Council Member Treyger’s office at (718) 307-7151.

Source: MyTudut/Flickr

The following is a press release from the offices of State Senator Marty Golden:

State Senator Martin J. Golden (R-C-I, Brooklyn) today is announcing that he has joined forces with Catholic Charities of Brooklyn and Queens to host a back to school collection drive for local students in need.

Residents are being encouraged to donate new school supplies including notebooks, crayons, back packs, pens, pencils, crayons, rulers, highlighters, washable glue sticks, 2-pocket folders, 3 x 5 line Index cards, etc.

Senator Marty Golden stated, “As we turn the calendar on the month of August, we begin to prepare our students and families to go back to school. For some families, the need to get their kids ready to learn and participate in another school year poses a financial challenge, and so we are being asked to help out and make a donation of some essential items. This year I hope that this community will again come together to support our neighbors in need so their children can have the same opportunities this year in the classroom. I hope you will join me in making a donation.”

Those wishing to make a donation of items can drop them off on or before Friday, August 15th at either of Senator Golden’s district offices at 7408-5th Avenue or at 3604 Quentin Road. For more information, please contact the Senator Golden’s office at (718) 238-6044.

Source: flickrized/Flickr

Is your kid the next Roger Federer or Anna Kournikova? They could be, and now there are free programs at local schools to help them get there.

The New York Junior Tennis & Learning (NYJTL) organization launched their free community tennis summer programs for kids earlier this month, and registration continues to be open.

The program provides free use of tennis racquets, qualified instructors and lessons to kids ages 5 to 18. Participants will learn the basics of tennis strokes and how to rally, and then be put to the test in competition with others of similar skill levels.

The summer season kicked off July 7, but there are no deadlines to register and no wait lists to slog through. Registration is done on-site, and parents or guardians must accompany the child during the registration process. It’s a six to eight week program which runs three to six hours a day, five days a week – although schedules vary from site to site.

Locally, kids can sign up and begin playing at the following area schools during the days and times indicated:

  • P.S. 229 – 1400 Benson Avenue - Monday through Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. - Site director: Colin Clarke
  • McDonald ParkMcDonald Avenue at Avenue S – Monday through Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. – Site director: Gennady Shuminov
  • P.S. 238 – 1633 East 8th Street - Wednesday and Thursday from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. – Site director: Colin Clarke
  • Andries Hudde Junior High School Playground2500 Nostrand Avenue – Monday, Wednesday, Friday from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. – Site director: Bob Spigner

More information can be found here. The full list of sites citywide can be found here.

Photo by Teri Brennan

Lane Rosen, right, with Dewey’s student scientists. Photo by Teri Brennan

The waters around New York City were once home to a thriving population of oysters, which served an important ecological role. After virtually disappearing in the 20th century, several efforts are underway to bring the species back.

Students of John Dewey High School (50 Avenue X) Marine Science program are on the front-lines of the revitalization effort in Gravesend Bay, monitoring a collection of oyster beds off of the 69th Street Pier in Bay Ridge.

The school teamed up with the Harbor School’s Billion Oyster Project, one of the organizations leading the oyster reef restorations around New York Harbor. Oysters, which work like living water filters, are a vital component to improving the water quality around New York City, and the reefs they form protect the shoreline by weakening waves and provide habitat to other marine life.

They were once abundant in our area, but vanished almost completely in the early 20th century as pollution, over-harvesting, disease and environmental hazards grew. New York City was developing, and as the population boomed so did the amount of sewage.

One of the oyster cages monitored by Dewey students. (Photo by Teri Brennan)

One of the oyster cages monitored by Dewey students. (Photo by Teri Brennan)

Thanks to new regulations implemented in the late 20th Century, water quality has seen a dramatic improvement and researchers are finding that the area can once again support the oysters, which were not just an environmental helper, but a staple of the New York City economy as it developed.

Restoration efforts began on a sizable scale back in 2009. As their initial pilot sites showed signs of success, organizations backing them began finding new sources of funding to grow the project – ultimately creating the goal of bringing one billion oysters back to the harbor over the next 20 years.

The team of Dewey students were on-site in Bay Ridge last Wednesday, pulling in cages and doing their regular checkups. Their teacher, Lane Rosen, said it’s a great way to teach them about marine biology and ecology in a living laboratory in a hands-on way.

The cages are moored to the eco-dock attached to the pier, and students collect data on growth and development of the oysters, analyze the water and make observations that are sent to the Harbor School for further analysis.

We look forward to the point when the reefs are not only self-sustaining, but able to be harvested (in a population-sensitive way) for fresh, tasty slurping.

The Brooklyn Public Library has expanded its annual Summer Meals Program, offering no-cost lunch to children and teens ages 18 and under.

It’s a major expansion for the program, run by the New York City Department of Education with federal funds, more than quadrupling it from the six sites available last year.

The program is made to ensure that during the summer months, when kids are out of school, no child or teen will go hungry. The season kicked off June 27 and last until August 29, with lunches served every weekday from 1:15 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. at each of the libraries.

It’s a no-questions-asked policy, and citizenship status is not a factor.

The following local branches are part of the program:

For the full list of participating branches, look here.

treyger

The following is a press release from the offices of Councilman Mark Treyger:

In response to concerns over the safety of students, staff and parents walking to P.S. 95 in Gravesend, the NYC Department of Transportation has agreed to Council Member Mark Treyger’s request to install a speed hump by the start of the upcoming school year. The speed hump will be installed along Van Sicklen Street to prevent drivers from speeding past the school, which currently occurs on a regular basis.

Immediately after hearing from worried parents and school leaders after taking office earlier this year, Council Member Treyger led Brooklyn DOT Commissioner Joseph Palmieri on a tour of the area to show him firsthand the constant speeding traffic that passes the school each morning and afternoon. Also on hand for the site visit was Assemblyman Bill Colton, school volunteer Vincent Sampieri, who brought the issue to Council Member Treyger’s attention, Principal Janet Ndzibah, PTA President Christine Schneider Lulu Elaza and other residents. As a result, the DOT conducted the necessary traffic studies and has worked with a homeowner on Van Sicklen Street who agreed to allow the city to install the speed hump near their driveway. The DOT now expects the work to be completed by early September, hopefully in time for the new school year.

“This is a simple but vital step we can take to protect the students of P.S. 95 as they walk to and from school each day. After all, there is nothing as important as the safety of our children. As soon as I heard about this issue, I knew it was imperative to act before any more accidents or close calls occur due to reckless and dangerous drivers speeding through that area. My thanks to Mr. Sampieri and the school’s leadership for bringing this to my attention, to Assemblyman Colton for his partnership on this issue, and to the DOT for agreeing to install this speed hump on behalf of P.S. 95,” said Council Member Treyger.

CORRECTION (4:36 p.m.): We received a note from Councilman Treyger’s office amending the above press release. The PTA president who is pictured and referenced is Lulu Elaza and not Christine Schneider.

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